[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /viewtopic.php on line 943: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone.
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /viewtopic.php on line 943: getdate(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone.
THE (ALMOST) UNDELETED • View topic - Ten favorite books

Ten favorite books

Any old topic will do, I suppose.

Ten favorite books

Postby Omphalos » Thu Nov 22, 2007 7:27 pm

Ive put a few of these lists up on various BBS' in the past. Every time I have done so I always list my favorite book as Dune. Ive been thinking about it quite a bit lately, and I don't think that Dune is my favorite anymore. I still love the book, but with all the shit that has kind of orbited the book in the last few years, I just think that my dogged enthusiasm for it has been killed. Or, maybe its just because Ive read it too many times, because that is pretty much how things go for me. Anyway, here is my current list of ten favorite SF books. Tell me what yours are too and why.

1. Bring the Jubilee, by Ward Moore. Probably the best alternate history novel I have ever read, by one of my favorite unknown author.

2. Where Late the Sweet Birds Sang, by Kate Wilhelm. An amazing end-of-the-world story involving clones. Wilhelm and her husband, Damon Knight started the Milford Writers Clinic which evolved into the current Clarion Writer's Workshop.

3. The Listeners, by James Gunn. Truly moving first contact story that heavily influenced Carl Sagan in his own more popular but slightly inferior novel called Contact. In this work Gunn pays much more attention to the interpersonal and social reactions to a signal from outer space, where as Sagan focused mainly on the reactions of those with political power who feared what would happen if society in general ever found out what was really going on.

4. Dune, by Frank Herbert. Can I come up with anything new to say about this one? I doubt it.

5. The Legacy of Heorot, by Larry Niven, Jerry Pournelle and Steven Barnes. An interstellar colonization novel combined with a monster epic. Light reading, and with a strongly conservative tone, but very exciting and worth every effort needed to find and read it. Barnes is one of the very few African American SF authors and despite recent failures, still IMHO has a bright future.

6. The Anubis Gates, by Tim Powers. This one, along with Homonculus by James Blaylock and Morlock Nights by K. W. Jeter pretty much started the highly underrated steampunk sub-genre. This is a combination SF and fantasy take on time travel set in a black-magic inspired Victorian England underworld.

7. Lilith's Brood, by Octavia Butler. Actually this is a trilogy of books made up by Dawn, Adulthood Rites and Imago, which is frequently referred to as the Xenogenesis trilogy. A race of aliens who achieve genetic diversity by mating with alien races come across Earth a few years after a devastating nuclear war. They nurse fragments of humanity back to health, seduce them and create a new race. Some day after another reading or two this one may be my number one.

8. This is the Way the World Ends, by James Morrow. A darkly humorous examination of the death of our race after a nuclear war. In it the souls of those who would have been born but for the war become animated and put the designers of the war on trial for crimes against the future. Powerfully moving and beautifully written, and absolutely chilling. I don't expect to ever read another one quite like this.

9. Gateway, by Frederik Pohl. A sarcastic look at the swings of luck in a pure SF setting (Last Call, by Tim Powers looks at the swings of luck in a fantasy setting). Maybe Pohl's best work, and considering the quality of his other books, that is saying something.

10. Getting to Know You, by David Marusek. This is a collection of short stories that examines the consequences of nanotech and AI in a highly advanced civilization that has not quite truly gone post-human yet. Marusek is one of my two favorite current authors, the other being Ted Chiang, whose anthology Stories of Your Life, and Others, would be in the number 11 position, if I were going that far.
Something is about to happen, Hal. Something wonderful!

-James C. Harwood, Science Fiction Writer, Straight (March 5, 1956 - May 25, 2010)



The Omphalos Umbrella Page
User avatar
Omphalos
Alien Overlord
 
Posts: 5680
Joined: Fri Oct 19, 2007 4:24 pm
Location: The Mighty Central Valley of California

Postby Phaedrus » Mon Nov 26, 2007 1:53 pm

There's not a single book in the Dune series that I would call my favorite SF book, but the six books as a whole surpass any other book/series that I can think of offhand.

As for a top ten list...I don't even know. It would probably be generic stuff, you know, Dune, Ender's Game, maybe something by PKD, and I don't know what else. I haven't been reading SF lately, and for some reason, when I invoke that category, very little comes to mind.
User avatar
Phaedrus
 
Posts: 318
Joined: Tue Nov 13, 2007 12:18 am

Postby Omphalos » Sat Dec 29, 2007 7:57 pm

Phaedrus wrote:I haven't been reading SF lately, and for some reason, when I invoke that category, very little comes to mind.


Don't worry. You'll come around eventually. :wink:
Something is about to happen, Hal. Something wonderful!

-James C. Harwood, Science Fiction Writer, Straight (March 5, 1956 - May 25, 2010)



The Omphalos Umbrella Page
User avatar
Omphalos
Alien Overlord
 
Posts: 5680
Joined: Fri Oct 19, 2007 4:24 pm
Location: The Mighty Central Valley of California

Postby Omphalos » Wed Jan 02, 2008 4:15 pm

Anyone else care to take a crack at their ten best books? Id like to hear so I can see if there are any amazing books Ive missed along the line.
Something is about to happen, Hal. Something wonderful!

-James C. Harwood, Science Fiction Writer, Straight (March 5, 1956 - May 25, 2010)



The Omphalos Umbrella Page
User avatar
Omphalos
Alien Overlord
 
Posts: 5680
Joined: Fri Oct 19, 2007 4:24 pm
Location: The Mighty Central Valley of California

Postby Mandy » Wed Jan 02, 2008 6:52 pm

I will stop procrastinating and make a list.. maybe tomorrow :)
User avatar
Mandy
 
Posts: 935
Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2007 6:28 pm

Postby Robspierre » Thu Jan 03, 2008 4:09 pm

Let's see"

1. Dune. Nuff said.

2. The Legion of Space books by Jack Williamson. Fu reads.

3. Falkenburg's Legion by Jerry Pournelle. i like how the baddies are not stack villians but have realistic shades of grey to them.

4. Time Enough for Love Robert A. Heinlein. What can I say, I like much of Heinlein's later work and it does fit in with some of my own beliefs.

5. Friday Robert A Heinlein My second favorite Heinlein work and one that I feel is overlooked .

6.John Carter of Mars Edgar Rice Burroughs Fun classic swashbuckling adventures on Mars.

7. Neuromancer William Gibson. Even though parts of it are dated it still is an amazing romp and read and visionary work.

8. A Canticle for Leibowitz Hell a fun read about a post nuclear era.

9.DragonRiders of Pern Anne McCaffrey Enjoyable reads and though many believe them to be fantasy a lot of science went into the creation of the world under the direction of John. W. Cambell.

10. Merchanter Universe C.J. Cherryh I love how the alians are truly alien and not humans in funny masks like so many are portrayed.


Rob
Friends are the family we choose.

http://kiltedrobspub.blogspot.com/
User avatar
Robspierre
Archivist
 
Posts: 959
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 11:52 am
Location: The Cascades of Oregon

Postby Omphalos » Thu Jan 03, 2008 4:24 pm

I have never read Pournelle by himself. That book is that good?
Something is about to happen, Hal. Something wonderful!

-James C. Harwood, Science Fiction Writer, Straight (March 5, 1956 - May 25, 2010)



The Omphalos Umbrella Page
User avatar
Omphalos
Alien Overlord
 
Posts: 5680
Joined: Fri Oct 19, 2007 4:24 pm
Location: The Mighty Central Valley of California

Postby Robspierre » Fri Jan 04, 2008 12:07 am

Its the foundation of the universe of The Mote in Gods Eye and The Gripping Hand. I enjoyed it as a wee pre-teen and it still holds a spot on my shelf though the politics are terribly outdated.

Rob
Friends are the family we choose.

http://kiltedrobspub.blogspot.com/
User avatar
Robspierre
Archivist
 
Posts: 959
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 11:52 am
Location: The Cascades of Oregon

Postby Omphalos » Fri Jan 04, 2008 12:28 am

Hmmmm. Ill have to give that try.
Something is about to happen, Hal. Something wonderful!

-James C. Harwood, Science Fiction Writer, Straight (March 5, 1956 - May 25, 2010)



The Omphalos Umbrella Page
User avatar
Omphalos
Alien Overlord
 
Posts: 5680
Joined: Fri Oct 19, 2007 4:24 pm
Location: The Mighty Central Valley of California

Postby Robspierre » Fri Jan 04, 2008 12:55 pm

Here Omph, this version has two books and some filler material to flesh out back story.

http://www.amazon.com/Falkenbergs-Legion-Jerry-Pournelle/dp/067172018X/ref=pd_sim_dbs_b_title_3



This has two books in one volume.

Rob
Friends are the family we choose.

http://kiltedrobspub.blogspot.com/
User avatar
Robspierre
Archivist
 
Posts: 959
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 11:52 am
Location: The Cascades of Oregon

Postby Mandy » Fri Jan 04, 2008 6:35 pm

I'm not putting these in order, just 10 books that stand out.

Dune. My dad handed me a copy when I was 15 or so. For several years I thought I was the only person who knew it was a great book.

Raising the Stones, by Sheri S. Tepper. Tepper is one of my favorite authors and I've read many of her books, Raising the Stones was my first. She's a feminist and a tree hugger, but she writes a good story. You can read a review here: http://www.sfsite.com/06a/rs129.htm

The Sparrow, by Mary Doria Russell. Not a book for the faint of heart, lol. I loved every sad page. I love science fiction that explores religion and culture. Review here: http://www.sfsite.com/~silverag/russell.html

The Left Hand of Darkness, by Ursula K. Le Guin. A wonderful book, if I was putting these in order this one would most likely be at the top. I hate it that all the reviews seem to focus on the gender thing, the book is about much more than that. Wikipedia has a great page about it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Left_Hand_of_Darkness

Swan Song, by Robert R. McCammon. In the aftermath of nuclear war, some strange and fantastic things happen. Not very realistic, as it has a few fantasy-like elements, but I remember loving it.

Aaaahhh!! My brain just seized up, I can't think of anymore at the moment. I'll try and finish it later. I bet I remember something as soon as I click submit. Of course i could just be lazy and add the rest of the Dune novels (FH only of course) but it's pretty much given that those books rise above most sci fi.
User avatar
Mandy
 
Posts: 935
Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2007 6:28 pm

Postby Omphalos » Fri Jan 04, 2008 7:09 pm

I loved Swan Song. McCammon was a great author before he retired, though I hear that he's coming out with something new. He wrote another one called, I think, Usher's Passing, that had a mutant as a character who had a very weak third arm coming out of his torso. It was just strong enough to carry a derringer, so if someone ever got the drop on him, surprise! Or was that this one? Its been so long. He also edited a book called Under the Fang, an anthology of vampire stories in which each story assumed that vampires had taken over the Earth. It was pretty cool.

Have you ever read Grass, by Tepper? That and the gate to Women's Country are my two favorite by her.
Something is about to happen, Hal. Something wonderful!

-James C. Harwood, Science Fiction Writer, Straight (March 5, 1956 - May 25, 2010)



The Omphalos Umbrella Page
User avatar
Omphalos
Alien Overlord
 
Posts: 5680
Joined: Fri Oct 19, 2007 4:24 pm
Location: The Mighty Central Valley of California

Postby Mandy » Fri Jan 04, 2008 8:15 pm

Yeah, I did read Grass and The Gate to Women's Country. I've read many of her books, once when I was at Barnes and Nobles I bought every Tepper book they had, lol... I live out in the sticks, so I gotta get what I want while I'm there. That was before I discovered online shopping :P One of my favorites is called The Companions, it's about dogs.

I've never read anything else by McCammon, maybe I'll check those out.
User avatar
Mandy
 
Posts: 935
Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2007 6:28 pm

Postby Crysknife » Sun Jan 13, 2008 9:17 pm

1. God Emperor of Dune

2. Armor, by Steakley

3. Stinger, by Robert R. McCammon.(You are all wrong, as this is by far his best Sci-Fi work :twisted: )

4. Tomorrow and Tomorrow, by Charles Sheffield

5. The World at the End of Time, by Pohl

6. Evolution, by Baxter

7. Rendezvous with Rama, by Clarke

8. Battlefield Earth, by Hubbard

9. Gateway, Pohl

10. The Jesus Incident, by Herbert and Ransom


This was hard, I'll bet I could come up with another list if I think about it a bit.
Image
User avatar
Crysknife
 
Posts: 100
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2008 9:52 pm

Postby Omphalos » Sun Jan 13, 2008 9:24 pm

I like Battlefield Earth. It it was not for all that weird Hubbardian hero-worship, I think I would like it a lot more. But when I bought that book a few years ago the clerk looked at me and asked "isnt that the book that that horrible movie came from?"

It really is a shame that movie sucked so very badly, because the book gets no respect at all (even though one of the things I like about the movie is its true dreadfulness).
Something is about to happen, Hal. Something wonderful!

-James C. Harwood, Science Fiction Writer, Straight (March 5, 1956 - May 25, 2010)



The Omphalos Umbrella Page
User avatar
Omphalos
Alien Overlord
 
Posts: 5680
Joined: Fri Oct 19, 2007 4:24 pm
Location: The Mighty Central Valley of California

Postby Crysknife » Sun Jan 13, 2008 9:34 pm

You're right Omph, that movie has to be the worst adaptation from a novel in film history. The movie left out about 70% of material that I felt was crucial to the story. Just terrible. But I'm with you, it's so bad it's almost good.

I love cheap, campy films.(or even huge budget flops) Beats a day at work anyway.


BTW, have you read Stinger? I think you'd like it.
Image
User avatar
Crysknife
 
Posts: 100
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2008 9:52 pm

Postby Omphalos » Sun Jan 13, 2008 9:40 pm

Crysknife wrote:BTW, have you read Stinger? I think you'd like it.


I have not. All of my McCammon save for Under the Fang went into the Great Darkness years ago. I need to reacquire them all, and I was planning on doing that soon so I could add them to the review pages. Ill include that one now, too!
Something is about to happen, Hal. Something wonderful!

-James C. Harwood, Science Fiction Writer, Straight (March 5, 1956 - May 25, 2010)



The Omphalos Umbrella Page
User avatar
Omphalos
Alien Overlord
 
Posts: 5680
Joined: Fri Oct 19, 2007 4:24 pm
Location: The Mighty Central Valley of California

Postby Crysknife » Sun Jan 13, 2008 9:43 pm

Just leave on the lights if you're reading it late at night.

:D
Image
User avatar
Crysknife
 
Posts: 100
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2008 9:52 pm

Postby Omphalos » Wed Jan 23, 2008 10:41 pm

Anyone else want to put up a list?
Something is about to happen, Hal. Something wonderful!

-James C. Harwood, Science Fiction Writer, Straight (March 5, 1956 - May 25, 2010)



The Omphalos Umbrella Page
User avatar
Omphalos
Alien Overlord
 
Posts: 5680
Joined: Fri Oct 19, 2007 4:24 pm
Location: The Mighty Central Valley of California

Postby tanzeelat » Wed Jan 30, 2008 2:49 am

My top ten sf novels:

    Undercover Aliens, AE van Vogt (1950)
    Dune, Frank Herbert (1965)
    Dhalgren, Samuel Delany (1975)
    The Ophiuchi Hotline, John Varley (1977)
    Where Time Winds Blow, Robert Holdstock (1981)
    Kairos, Gwyneth Jones (1988)
    Metrophage, Richard Kadrey (1988)
    Take Back Plenty, Colin Greenland (1990)
    Against A Dark Background, Iain M Banks (1993)
    Coelestis, Paul Park (1995)


Throughout 2007, I reread each one (plus an additional two, so I had one per month) to see if they were still favourites.
User avatar
tanzeelat
 
Posts: 136
Joined: Tue Jan 29, 2008 1:34 am

Postby Star Dust » Sat Feb 02, 2008 8:50 am

In no particular order (and may not come to 10)

Dune by Frank Herbert
My brother and sister were reading this, and my brother was telling me about
400 meter long worms. Well, I just had to see what this was all about!
This was almost 30 years ago, btw.

Mona Lisa Overdrive by William Gibson
The only Sprawl book I read, but damn if Gibson wasn't ahead of his time.
When I read this we (society) were just on the cusp of the Internet Revolution.
The phrase "jacking in" still hadn't made it into the common
collective. This was some cutting edge stuff.

Earth by David Brin
I found his Uplift series rather underwhelming, but I really, really
liked this one. I think Brin nails the future commodity situation on the
head: information is free, water is $20/gallon.

Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert A. Heinlien
A sentimental choice. The first scifi I ever read. This is still the number
one book I would recommend to young people reading scifi for the first
time.

Steven King's The Dark Tower series
Okay, call it "speculative fiction" if you will. Still, for a pulp writer, this
dood cooked up one HELL of a story. Classic themes of sacrifice, salvation
and prophecy. Most of King's work is situational, but here he has crafted
amazing characters as well. The fourth book is to Dark Tower what GEoD
is to Dune, hence it's my favorite of the series.

Eh, that's all I can muster at the moment. More to come later.
User avatar
Star Dust
 
Posts: 207
Joined: Fri Feb 01, 2008 7:24 pm
Location: somewhere over the rainbow

Postby Omphalos » Sat Feb 02, 2008 11:09 am

I have never read Brin's Earth. I am in the middle of Bova's Mars right now though, so maybe next, if I get into a theme?
Something is about to happen, Hal. Something wonderful!

-James C. Harwood, Science Fiction Writer, Straight (March 5, 1956 - May 25, 2010)



The Omphalos Umbrella Page
User avatar
Omphalos
Alien Overlord
 
Posts: 5680
Joined: Fri Oct 19, 2007 4:24 pm
Location: The Mighty Central Valley of California

Postby Liege-Killer » Sat Feb 02, 2008 12:38 pm

Omphalos wrote:McCammon was a great author before he retired [...]


I haven't read any of his work in many years, but I remember The Wolf's Hour being the best werewolf novel I've ever read.
User avatar
Liege-Killer
 
Posts: 432
Joined: Tue Dec 25, 2007 10:06 am

Postby Liege-Killer » Sat Feb 02, 2008 12:41 pm

Omphalos wrote:Anyone else want to put up a list?


Oh all right, I guess I'll C&P my list from Worm's. That'll save me some extra thinking. Here we are:


Dune by Frank Herbert. No comment necessary, I trust.

The Dosadi Experiment by Frank Herbert. His best non-Dune novel that I've read so far, and the only one that comes close to that level of brilliance and intricacy (although Whipping Star is also of high quality).

Liege-Killer by Christopher Hinz. Been a favorite since my teen years. Great all-around blend of hard and soft sci-fi: cool weapons and gadgets, exciting combat scenes, social and political angles, a convincing post-apocalyptic world with a rich background history, strong characters, and plenty of suspense, mystery, and revelations. First book in the Paratwa Saga.

A Time of Changes by Robert Silverberg. My first introduction to soft/social sci-fi, and I think I've re-read this one more times than any other book. Not a very long or complex novel, surely, but I've always liked its theme of individual vs. society.

Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card. You all know this one. Honestly, this is more like a top twenty-five book for me, and if I could think of one more top ten, it'd get kicked off. Still, good book.

Foundation by Isaac Asimov. Another book I first read as a teen, and recall little of in the way of details these days. But I do clearly remember the grand sense of awe it inspired in me back then, like almost no other book ever has. I look forward to re-reading this sometime (and the entire series).

Beggars in Spain by Nancy Kress. Another of my favorite social sci-fi novels, from one of my favorite modern authors. Set in the near future, it explores the social consequences of genetic engineering and how it may well create different classes of citizens and all the conflict that could entail. First in the Sleepless trilogy.

In Conquest Born by C.S. Friedman. I'm more fond of Freidman's Coldfire trilogy, but that's more along the lines of fantasy. This novel is about two future human societies that have diverged, settled in different parts of space, and are engaged in an ongoing conflict; and about two new leaders, each a misfit in his/her own society, and how they take the ancient war up a notch into the realm of personal vendetta. One thing I love is that the chapters are headed by quotes from works of literature from within the fictional universe of the novel (a la Dune), and they are quite fascinating in their own right.

Ranks of Bronze by David Drake. My favorite military sci-fi novel ever; not that I've read much of that style, but I've always loved this book. An ancient Roman legion is captured by aliens and forced to fight for them on various planets (all the advanced aliens have an agreement to do all their fighting via low-tech slave armies). Legionnaires and aliens -- what more could you want in a book?

Darwinia by Robert Charles Wilson. There's not a lot I can say about this one without giving away major spoilers. Let's just say that in this novel, all is not as it seems (that's an understatement), and the explanation behind it all is quite mind-blowing.
User avatar
Liege-Killer
 
Posts: 432
Joined: Tue Dec 25, 2007 10:06 am

Postby Himachil » Mon Feb 04, 2008 2:43 pm

Dune; Frank Herbert
(Similar or same reasons as everyone else...)

Day of the Triffids
; John Wyndham
(I'm surprised I haven't seen more Wyndham titles posted about the internet... He has got to be a favourite author of mine. Fantastically believable cosy catastrophes)

Time Enough For Love; Robert Heinlein
(Tough call... but probably my fave Heinlein, after Moon is a Harsh Mistress, or Friday, or Stranger, or Troopers... Lazarus Long has to win it though.)

More than Human; Theodore Sturgeon
(Brilliant - interesting ideas on evolution with the Homo Gestalt concept and the consequences of that. Enjoyable writing style to boot.)

Sirens of Titan; Kurt Vonnegut
(A very very neat book - it is amazing how it all works out and the way the story is told is amazing. The only Vonnegut book I've read so far, more planned soon)

Last and First Men; Olaf Stapledon
(It's impersonal, has no characters, no real plot, no dialogue... and is utterly mindblowing.)

A Canticle for Leibowitz: Walter Miller
(Also enjoyed the sequel (Wild Horse Woman) almost as much - even though it was never going to be as good.)

Hyperion; Dan Simmons
(Fantastic book with a brilliant structure... the second one? ...not so much)

Solaris; Stanislaw Lem
(I really really like Solaris.)

(However I still need to read loads and loads of other authors - namely Asimov and Clarke and Gibson and Card ... Unfortunately I am proper slow at reading these days)
And that, children, is how the little bunny rabbit got his fluffy white tail.

As a minimum, we must demand from SF that it be wiser than the world it speaks to.
--Darko Suvin; On the Poetics of the Science Fiction Genre
User avatar
Himachil
 
Posts: 245
Joined: Sun Feb 03, 2008 11:10 am
Location: Cool Britannia

Postby Omphalos » Mon Mar 24, 2008 2:44 pm

<bump>

Anyone else got a list they want to put up?
Something is about to happen, Hal. Something wonderful!

-James C. Harwood, Science Fiction Writer, Straight (March 5, 1956 - May 25, 2010)



The Omphalos Umbrella Page
User avatar
Omphalos
Alien Overlord
 
Posts: 5680
Joined: Fri Oct 19, 2007 4:24 pm
Location: The Mighty Central Valley of California

Postby A Thing of Eternity » Wed Jun 04, 2008 6:56 pm

These are kinda in order, but that kind of thing really shifts with my mood.

Dune – Frank Herbert. Have you read this? It’s kinda neat.

Heroes Die / Blade of Tyshalle – Matthew Woodring Stover. Technically these two are an SF/Fantasy cross, but once you get past the various cheese factors present they are truly well written. The story revolves around a future society where people have discovered a parallel earth filled with strange sentient beings and magic. The logical thing for those people to do is of course send in “actors” with implanted trans-dimensional transmitters and sell their recorded experiences as criminals and heroes to the masses as entertainment. Read like hack and slash thrillers, but go much deeper than the average action story. I’ve read these over and over again.

The Jesus Incident – Frank Herbert and Bill Ransom. Hard to explain exactly what I loved about this book, but it quickly became one of my favorites with every page I read.

Lady Of Mazes – Karl Schroeder. New kid on the block of SF. His day job is working as a foresight specialist for various groups including the government and military. This book is his best on the topic of augmented reality, where characters are permanently hooked up to a network called Inscape. It explores a deeply disturbing while strangely beautiful future for humanity and takes on the subject of free will. I may be biased as he is one of few Canadian authors (happens to hail from the same community as A.E. Von Vogt, whose work I have yet to read) but I think this is a must read, even just for the imagination involved in it’s creation.

The Nine Billion Names of God – Sir Arthur C. Clarke. I’ve just been getting into Clarke, and actually prefer his short stories to the novels I’ve read so far. I’d have put Rama on here but I’m sure every one has read it, and think that this collection of shorts should be in everyone’s collection.

Journey to the Center of the Earth – Jules Verne. You know it, you’ve read it. There’s just something about reading SF from over a hundred years ago.

Foundation Series – Isaac Asimov. I read these books in chronological order, reading the newer books first. The new books were much better written than the first ones but, as I think someone else put here, I had the feeling that I was reading something monumental.

Mellonta Tauta – Edgar Allan Poe. This is just a short story. It’s not particularly fantastic, until you remember that it’s SF from over a hundred and fifty years ago. It makes my list because it really made me smile, and I love Poe.

Terraforming Earth – Jack Williamson. Obviously he’s a heavyweight, and this is one of his most recent works. This is a book pieced together out of serial shorts, much like the first Foundation books. It deals with a group of clones living on the moon who are repeatedly resurrected (sans genetic memory) and charged with the task of terraforming Earth again and again after disaster strikes. Some of the shorts were better than others, but combined they have some serious value.

The Forever War
- Joe Haldeman. I just read this one so maybe it's still a bit too fresh to be objective. My problem is I really do like Military SF, but haven't liked what I've read from Heinlein so far, and Joe seems to be my solution (though I have enjoyed when Pournelle and Niven get together). This book gave me what I was looking for and then some.
User avatar
A Thing of Eternity
 
Posts: 2070
Joined: Fri May 30, 2008 1:22 pm
Location: Calgary Alberta

Postby Omphalos » Wed Jun 04, 2008 8:35 pm

Good list. Id guess that you have eclectic tastes since I have only heard of about a third of those books. Thanks.
Something is about to happen, Hal. Something wonderful!

-James C. Harwood, Science Fiction Writer, Straight (March 5, 1956 - May 25, 2010)



The Omphalos Umbrella Page
User avatar
Omphalos
Alien Overlord
 
Posts: 5680
Joined: Fri Oct 19, 2007 4:24 pm
Location: The Mighty Central Valley of California

Postby A Thing of Eternity » Wed Jun 04, 2008 8:41 pm

I need to read alot more before I could put together a top ten SF list that really meant much. I'm stumped on what to read next, I think my girl has a copy of Fahrenheit 451 around. I've been meaning to get to it....

EDIT: Nope, it's not here.
User avatar
A Thing of Eternity
 
Posts: 2070
Joined: Fri May 30, 2008 1:22 pm
Location: Calgary Alberta

Postby Trang » Sat Aug 30, 2008 7:07 pm

Not really in order, ten is hard, but these are top favorites (trying to throw out some different one I dont normally talk about)

1. Dune, Frank Herbert, nothing to be said except it is epic, and luv it to death.

2. Starship Troopers, R. A. HeinLein, Military Sci-Fi fan from the get go. The opening scene where Rico drops to the skinny planey just grabs you by the throat and it goes from there.

3. Forever War, Joe Haldeman, Another Military Sci-Fi that is counterpoint to STT. Well written, stong characters, and just mind bending plot.

4. Enders Game, O. S. Card, Military Sci-fi sorry about that but this book moves from the get go and just keeps going. The pace is furious, the writing is top notch, and the plot twist at the end is a keeper.

5. Lord Valentines Castle, R. Silverberg, I have read this book at least 4 times. Silverberg is a writer that goes under the radar, but about as prolific as they come. Im ashamed I havent read more of his work. Valentine is introduced, you get the plot, and you just go along for the ride, never missing a beat.

6. Chronicles of Amber, Roger Zelazney, Corwin Amber is one of my favorite characters of all time. The amnesia theme reminds me of LVC above. He works his way back from an accident and the huge impact of his life and family and they're otherrealm abilities is just outright amazing to me.

7. Titan, John Varley, this is a very unique world scenario setup by Varley. He brings you into the story with a strong female character and very talently introduce's you to the alien landscape. There is even a homage to Dune in the book, which I found fun.

8. Tarnsman of Gor, John Norman, The opposite of earth scenario is very interesting. Norman spins a tale with Tarl Cabot on Gor and Gorean Philosophy that is very interesting. The Series of books reaches into the high 20's, and they are fairly strong even at that level. The portion of the story he ponders on regarding slave girls and such can get a bit monotenous, but I overlook that for the great adventure.

9. Ringworld, Larry Niven. Straight up hard sci fi that is fun and fast moving.

10. Starfist: First to fight, David Sherman and Dan Cragg, ok Again with the Military Sci-fi, I know. This series is just a Pleasure to me to read. Marines in the 25th century. Great characters, great back story, and did I mention Marines is space? Join the Marine Corps, Travel to exotic planets, Meet Exotic People and Kill them!!!


Im passionate and have favorites across the spectrum from Bradbury to Jules Verne and back, above is just some of the ones I treasure.

Trang
User avatar
Trang
 
Posts: 51
Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2008 4:45 pm
Location: Hot Tub Time Machine

Postby The Phantom » Sun Aug 31, 2008 4:47 pm

in order of preference by series

Dune (whole series of course, but Dune is at the top of those 6)

Speaker for the dead, Orson Scott Card (whole series, but this is by far my favourite with Ender's Game in second)

Foundation, Asimov (again, whole series, but Foundation's Edge gets a notable mention, still workign thru GE series and havn't touched the robots novels yet but just bought them all used yesterday so i can't wait)

Homecoming series, Card (2 words: awe. some.)

NOTE: going to soon read Bank's culture series, and from what I've heard I anticipate it being somewhere in this list.

non-series:
1984, Orwell (also animal farm)

Three, Ted Dekker

I am America and so can you, Colbert
User avatar
The Phantom
 
Posts: 597
Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 8:06 pm
Location: Toronto

Postby GamePlayer » Sun Aug 31, 2008 6:14 pm

Dune (Frank Herbert)

Lord of the Rings (J.R.R. Tolkein)

Watchmen (Alan Moore)

Fight Club (Chuck Palahniuk)

The Player of Games (Iain M. Banks)

Nausicaa of The Valley Of The Wind (Hayao Miyazaki)

I, Robot (Isaac Asimov)

Ender's Game (Orson Scott Card)

1984 (George Orwell)

Animal Farm (George Orwell)
"What are we to call him, this Player of Games?"

"The books of Kevin J Anderson and Brian Herbert lie in a realm of uncertainty between self-conscious absurdity and genuine failure"
User avatar
GamePlayer
 
Posts: 1156
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2008 1:38 pm
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Postby Sparafucile » Fri Sep 05, 2008 10:42 am

1) Book of Lost Tales 1 - J.R.R. Tolkien ed. Christopher Tolkien

2) Book of Lost Tales 2 - J.R.R. Tolkien ed. Christopher Tolkien

3) God Emperor of Dune - Frank Herbert

4) Heretics of Dune - Frank Herbert

5) The Silmarillion - J.R.R. Tolkien ed. Christopher Tolkien

6) The Fountainhead - Ayn Rand

7) Lord of the Rings - J.R.R. Tolkien

8 ) King's Sacrifice - Margaret Weis

9) Ghost Legion - Margaret Weis

10)Tie between Children of Dune and Dune Messiah - Frank Herbert

Yeah, I'm a huge Tolkien fan 8)
User avatar
Sparafucile
 
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Jan 29, 2008 8:12 am


Return to General Chat

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron